Hospitable to the Hostile – Jesus Harbored in Derrida?

I hope to come back and comment on this. My morning read had me mashing some things up.

Demonstrating his own openness to continual revision, Derrida coined a new sign – hospitality – by synthesizing the words “hospitality” and “hostility.” Noting that both come from the same root word, the French hote – which can mean host, guest or stranger – he suggests that authentic hospitality necessitates hostility toward the person or idea one welcomes. Otherwise, acts of hosting are nothing more than exchanges of entertainment among friends. (Changing Signs of Truth, Downing, Kindle, loc 1843)

Jesus,

Then Jesus said to the person who had invited him, “When you host a lunch or dinner, don’t invite your friends, your brothers and sisters, your relatives, or rich neighbors. If you do, they will invite you in return and that will be your reward. Instead, when you give a banquet, invite the poor, crippled, lame, and blind. (Luke 14:12-13, CEB)

And,

Luke,

All the tax collectors and sinners were gathering around Jesus to listen to him. The Pharisees and legal experts were grumbling, saying, “This man welcomes sinners and eats with them.” (Luke 15:1-2, CEB)

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About the Author
Husband to Patty. Daddy to Kimberly and Tommie. Grandpa Doc to Cohen, Max, Fox, and Marlee. Pastor to Snow Hill Baptist Church. Graduate of Oklahoma Baptist University and Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Reading. Photography. Golf. Colorado. Jeeping. Friend. The views and opinions expressed here are my own and should not be construed as representing the corporate views of the church I pastor.