Creativity and Church … “Utopia Joe”

Oppositional thinking often leads us to exclude the very things that might give us life. Evaluating options often leaves us choosing between “this” or “that.” And, when we make our choice we moralize that choice in such a way we assert we made the “right” choice rather than the “wrong” choice.

When it comes to life and faith we must admit there are things that are not squarely set between the moral poles of right and wrong. Some things are different. But that does not mean wrong. Too often different is feared. It may lead us to . . .. Creativity and Church are often like oil and water. Yet, some of the language in the Scriptures is image rich as to evoke strong emotions – a creative art.

I read with interest of Joe Bohrer, “Utopia Joe.” It seems at points along his experience church and creativity were at odds. Joe, according to the article “. . . wanted to have these churches that are around today – wearing jeans or a T-shirt to church, contemporary music and videos.” The battle took its toll and Joe left ministry. He found a way to express the creative streak that is the gift of God. But in his experience, he still runs into those who will not let the creative impulse roam too wildly. He said,

We have people who say they want to see Oklahoma grow, but when it comes down to it there is the same resistance there was in the church.

It is all to easy to re-write that sentence substituting “Oklahoma’ with “church.” And “church” with “Oklahoma.” I guess people really resist the possibilities of the creative impluse regardless their context. I am glad Joe found a way to express his gift of the image of God.

About the Author
Husband to Patty. Daddy to Kimberly and Tommie. Grandpa Doc to Cohen, Max, Fox, and Marlee. Pastor to Snow Hill Baptist Church. Graduate of Oklahoma Baptist University and Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Reading. Photography. Golf. Colorado. Jeeping. Friend. The views and opinions expressed here are my own and should not be construed as representing the corporate views of the church I pastor.