Eclectic as Post-Ecumenical or, Thinking With Your Mouth Open

“Don’t chew with your mouth open.” Who doesn’t remember the early admonition to better etiquette? I do.

Over time we all learn to stymie the more rudimentary habits most human beings exhibit. Are there times where you wished no one was looking and you could eat as you wished?

Thinking With Your Mouth Open

Theological education, formally experienced, often comes with learning to keep your mouth shut. Learn what is accepted for your given Tradition or place on the theological spectrum.

Crackers-Grape-Juice-2-150x150Recently Jason Micheli, Teer Hardy, and Morgan Guyton launched a new podcast, Crackers & Grape Juice. In their inaugural episode Jason noted they would be thinking with their mouths open. Those of us who like to think out loud appreciate the vivid description.

If your theological education came with certain parameters you know that you must be careful where you think with your mouth open. Here at /patheological/ it is hoped a place will be created for a place to engage and interact with a variety of voices the help us think well in our day so that we might encourage an ever increasing number of organic, pastor-theologians.

Listen in for some of those who will be on the podcast in the coming weeks.

Eclectic as Post-Ecumenical

On the second episode of Crackers & Grape Juice, Jason and Teer interview Brian Zhand. The two-part episode includes a conversation about Zhand’s new book, Water to Wine. I have it in the queue.

One of five words Brian used to describe his way forward in his own personal journey was eclectic. Immediately I thought of Len Sweet’s library at his home on Orcas Island. Some might consider his style eccentric. But, if you look around, it is more eclectic.

It dawned on me eclectic might be a better word to use for those of us who have found a more robust theological adventure in the breadth of the Christian Tradition. Rather than looking for how to reduce the Great Tradition to a minimalist vision with which to coral the diversity found in Christian History, we should be appreciative of the way a broad interest keeps us from feedback loops and echo chambers.

Listen in for some thoughts on this emerging thought in my mind.

What’s Ahead?

Look for upcoming interviews with Thomas J. Oord, Adam Clark, Phillip Nation, Tony Jones, Tripp Fuller, and more.

Thanks for listening and remember to share the podcast!

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About the Author
Husband to Patty. Daddy to Kimberly and Tommie. Grandpa Doc to Cohen, Max, Fox, and Marlee. Pastor to Snow Hill Baptist Church. Graduate of Oklahoma Baptist University and Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Reading. Photography. Golf. Colorado. Jeeping. Friend. The views and opinions expressed here are my own and should not be construed as representing the corporate views of the church I pastor.